March 29, 2023

These bizarre objects are all health gadgets – but can you work out what they’re meant to treat? – Daily Mail

Genie’s lamp that makes a splash

Nosebuddy, £17.99, mad-hq.com

This genie’s lamp-like device is a neti pot, used to flush out the sinuses and ease congestion. You fill it with sterile, salt water and, with a tilted head, you pour the water into one nostril — by tilting your head sideways, the water drains out the other nostril, bringing mucus that may have clogg…….

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Genie’s lamp that makes a splash

Nosebuddy, £17.99, mad-hq.com

This genie’s lamp-like device is a neti pot, used to flush out the sinuses and ease congestion. You fill it with sterile, salt water and, with a tilted head, you pour the water into one nostril — by tilting your head sideways, the water drains out the other nostril, bringing mucus that may have clogged the sinuses with it.

‘Neti pots can be helpful after a cold, during hay fever or to help sinus issues where a build-up of mucus in the nose can cause discomfort,’ says Professor Paul Chatrath, a consultant ear, nose and throat surgeon at Spire Hartswood Hospital in Essex. 

‘It flushes out congestion but also cleans the tiny hair cells in the nose, helping them start working effectively again.’

And it might reduce hospitalisation from Covid. A study published in August by the University of Georgia, U.S., looked at twice-daily nasal irrigation in 79 people with Covid and found it led to eight times fewer hospitalisations than the national average.

‘Nasal irrigation is effective, but you must use distilled or cooled boiled water to reduce the risk of contamination,’ says Professor Chatrath.

Nosebuddy

Red light laser fix 

Theradome, from £699, theradomeforhairloss.co.uk

It might look like a bicycle helmet, but Theradome is said to treat certain types of hair loss.

The helmet emits red light into the scalp that stimulates hair follicles, increasing the rate of hair growth in cases of hormone-related thinning. Use the helmet for 20 minutes twice a week.

‘Studies have shown that LLLT — low-level laser therapy — can stimulate hair growth,’ says Dr Anastasia Therianou, a consultant dermatologist and hair loss specialist at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London. ‘Large randomised controlled trials have demonstrated statistically significant re-growth by hair count [the number of hairs on the scalp] in both men and women after treatment.

‘However, more studies are needed to support efficacy.’

She adds: ‘It only works on some types of hair loss — specifically male and female pattern baldness, and it’s important that a diagnosis is made by a specialist before trying LLLT.

‘These devices should not be used by patients with skin cancers of the scalp or those who take certain antibiotics and diuretic medications.’

Theradome

Drilling remedy 

Tvidler, from £29.95, tvidler.com

It looks like a drill …….

Source: https://news.google.com/__i/rss/rd/articles/CBMidWh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmRhaWx5bWFpbC5jby51ay9oZWFsdGgvYXJ0aWNsZS0xMTQwMDEzNy9UaGVzZS1iaXphcnJlLW9iamVjdHMtaGVhbHRoLWdhZGdldHMtd29yay10aGV5cmUtbWVhbnQtdHJlYXQuaHRtbNIBeWh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmRhaWx5bWFpbC5jby51ay9oZWFsdGgvYXJ0aWNsZS0xMTQwMDEzNy9hbXAvVGhlc2UtYml6YXJyZS1vYmplY3RzLWhlYWx0aC1nYWRnZXRzLXdvcmstdGhleXJlLW1lYW50LXRyZWF0Lmh0bWw?oc=5